BLISTERED CAULIFLOWER

 

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Poor, neglected and rejected cauliflower –    steamed or boiled into tasteless mush that no amount of cheese sauce can rescue.  Is it any wonder so many people are cauliflower haters.  This recipe is pure magic.  Roasted at a high temperature caramelized florets of cauliflower becomes intensely sweet nutty morsels that are highly addictive, and incredibly versatile.  Blistered cauliflower as a side dish shines.  Add it to a salad – bravo! Toss it with pasta – bellissimo!

 

BLISTERED CAULIFLOWER
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Roast cauliflower at a high temperature and you have a dish that is sweet, nutty and absolutely addictive. Use as a side dish, toss with pasta, add to a salad.
Ingredients
  • l large head of cauliflower
  • 3 generous tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground pepper,
  • a handful of fresh thyme sprigs
  • ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 3 tbs. panko crumbs
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425F.
  2. Cut cauliflower into florets
  3. Toss on a large rimmed baking sheet or pan with olive oil, and season to taste with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Use the largest pan you have so the cauliflower roasts - not steams.
  4. Sprinkle with half the fresh thyme sprigs
  5. Roast, tossing occasionally, until almost tender 35-45 minutes.
  6. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and panko crumbs
  7. Roast about 10 minutes longer until cauliflower is tender and cheese melts
  8. Sprinkle with fresh thyme sprigs and serve.

 

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3 Responses to BLISTERED CAULIFLOWER

  1. Pingback: BLISTERED CAULIFLOWER | Bel' Occhio's Blog

  2. Tricia says:

    This sounds delish, Virginia! We might have to try this with gluten-free breadcrumbs this week. :)

    • admin says:

      I am going to warn you, Tricia. Who’s ever cooking in the kitchen that day may end up eating most of the cauliflower. The extreme heat caramelizes this bland vegetable and with a little salt it becomes positively addictive. Of course, the good good cook most taste taste taste what they are cooking and therein lies the delicious problem. XX Virginia

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